Back in the 1930s, 127 film format was considered as a small format not delivering the quality that professionals were used to. At that time photographs were often not enlarged, but usually only contact prints were made. So up to a point, regardless of the serious effort to manufacture the 4x4 Rolleiflex cameras with top quality, it was somewhat seen as a small replica of the ‘’real’’ Rolleiflex, the 6x6. This in spite that Leitz had been developing a 35mm (cine film) camera since 1925 (called Leica), which was gaining quite a success. The development of a camera by F&H in the 4x4 format was also pushed by the competition in 127 format, as other brands (such as Zeiss-Ikon) were putting in the market 127 cameras in the early 30s (for example the Kolibri or the Baby Ikonta). Claus Prochnow (Rollei Report 1) is of course the major source of factory data, John Phillips (The Classic Rollei) gives a comprehensive account on the cameras’ evolution, and Ian Parker (Collectors’ Guide) is the best reference for serial number ranges of individual models.

Going small: the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original

The Rolleiflex 4x4 was the second TLR camera type produced by Franke & Heidecke, following immediately after the Original. In fact the production of the later specimens of the Rolleiflex Original was simultaneous with the delivery of the first 4x4 cameras, in 1931 and early 1932. The Rolleiflex 4x4 Original includes four distinct models, but here I only deal with the first three, which do not have double bayonet on the taking lens. The fourth model, called Sports, is dealt within a specific page – similar to what was done by John Phillips in the Classic Rollei book. However in a structural point of view all four models are part of the same series.

The 4x4 camera shows important advances in relation to the Original 6x6 model, and a year later of its introduction the improvements were incorporated in the 6x6 Standard of 1932, which was a success and definitely put F&H as the leaders of TLR manufacture. The technical improvements of the 4x4 included as major feature the crank to advance film with automatic stops. The film had still to be positioned in the first frame via the red window, but then it would stop at each succeeding frame – no double exposure lock though. This improvement was a necessity when 4x4 film (127) was chosen, as the backpaper of the film had no marks interspaced for 4x4 frames.

A lever on the right of the taking lens accomplishes shutter tensioning and release. Shutter is tensioned for all speeds but not for the B and T positions, as forcing shutter tension while at these settings may damage some components of the shutter.

On the left side, the focusing knob is small. In this face you find also the knob for holding the film in the upper chamber and the anchor to attach the neck strap. On the opposite side there is the crank wind, and above you find the small window of the frame counter. The neck strap anchor bears the reset button. 

(A-D) View of the four sides of the viewing hood in position for waiste level view. The viewing hood has independent lateral flaps and eye level vision via the cross flap with central mirror for pupil reflex. Note the depth-of-field table on the back panel of the viewing hood with white background.

 

(E-F) The viewing hood from top, closed and opened, showing the magnifying loupe.

(G) The viewing hood in position for eye level view, with the back front panel closed.

 

(H) Bottom of the camera.

 A

 B

 C

 D

 E

 F

 E

G

H

The front panel. The viewing lens, a triplet Heidoskop-Anastigmat (6cm 1:2.8), has a simple slip-on bayonet of 28.5mm. The taking lens is a four-element Tessar from Carl Zeiss Jena (6cm 1:3.5) also with a simple slip-on bayonet of 28.5mm. Apertures are within the range 3.5 to 22 in a normal scale. The shutter, is a Compur C00 and a lateral lever operates cocking and releasing. No small window on the top of the viewing lens for operating settings.

(A) The taking chamber, and the upper uptake spool chamber - note the bilobed pressure foil.

 

(B) The lower spool chamber.

(C) The back is hinged and detachable. Has the red window positioned at the middle. The closing mechanism is simple without locking lever, and the tripod mount is 1/4. The inside of the back has fixed channelled pressure plate and crackled paint.

B

 A

C

First Model 411

 

Serial no.: 146888

Date: 1932

Viewing lens: Heidoskop-Anastigmat (O.A.S.) Triplet 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 132879) – bayonet 28.5mm

Taking lens: Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 1346355) – bayonet 28.5mm

Notes: Depth-of-field table on back of viewing hood. Focusing knob not covered marked ‘’Made in Germany’’ (export camera).

The four views of the camera. No major difference for the preceding model, except the focusing knob, now with scale in a black background.

(A-D) View of the four sides of the viewing hood in position for waiste level view. Note the depth-of-field table, now with black background.

 

(E-F) The viewing hood from top, closed and opened, showing the magnifying loupe.

(G) The viewing hood in position for eye level view, with the back front panel closed.

 

(H) Bottom of the camera.

 A

 B

 C

 D

 E

 F

 E

G

H

The front plate presents no major differences to previous.

Rolleiflex 4x4 Original

First Model

Names

Factory: 4RF K.1A Models 410 (1:3.5) and 411 (1:2.8)

Prochnow: 4x4 Model 1 Tessar 3.5 (PR 078) and Model 1 Tessar 2.8 (PR 079)

Phillips: Rolleiflex 4x4 (1931-38) Models 410 and 411

Serial numbers

410: 123,000 to (?)

411: 125,000 (?) to at least 146,888

Production dates

410: March 1931 to January 1933

411: July 1931 to January 1933

Production

410: 6200

411: 3300

The first model of the 4x4 Rolleiflex was released in 1931. Lenses are separated centre to centre by 37mm. The front panel can be upgraded and the focusing mechanism is now based on 4 screws rather on three as the Rolleiflex Original 6x6. The back is hinged and detachable, with a central red window. Parallax is compensated by reduced focusing screen area.

(A-D) View of the four sides of the viewing hood in position for waiste level view. The viewing hood has independent lateral flaps and eye level vision via the cross flap with central mirror for pupil reflex.

 

(E-F) The viewing hood from top, closed and opened, showing the magnifying loupe.

(G) The viewing hood in position for eye level view, with the back front panel closed.

 

(H) Bottom of the camera.

 A

 B

 C

 D

 E

 F

 E

G

H

(A) The taking chamber, and the upper uptake spool chamber - note the bilobed pressure foil.

 

(B) The lower spool chamber.

(C) The back is hinged and detachable. Externally has no exposure table and the red window is positioned at the middle. The closing mechanism is simple without locking lever, and the tripod mount is 1/4. The inside of the back has fixed channelled pressure plate and crackled paint.

B

 A

C

(A-D) View of the four sides of the viewing hood in position for waiste level view. The viewing hood has independent lateral flaps and eye level vision via the cross flap with central mirror for pupil reflex.

 

(E-F) The viewing hood from top, closed and opened, showing the magnifying loupe.

(G) The viewing hood in position for eye level view, with the back front panel closed.

 

(H) Bottom of the camera.

 A

 B

 C

 D

 E

 F

 E

G

H

Third Model 423

 

Serial no.: 157317

Date: 1936?

Viewing lens: Heidoscop-Anastigmat (O.A.S.) Triplet 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 156371) – bayonet 28.5mm

Taking lens: Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 1372509) – bayonet 28.5mm

Notes: Depth-of-field table on back of viewing hood. Exposure table at the back of the camera. Focusing knob not covered with leather (domestic camera). Compur-Rapid marked on the outer rotating ring of shutter.

(A-D) View of the four sides of the viewing hood in position for waiste level view. The viewing hood has independent lateral flaps and eye level vision via the cross flap with central mirror for pupil reflex.

 

(E-F) The viewing hood from top, closed and opened, showing the magnifying loupe.

(G) The viewing hood in position for eye level view, with the back front panel closed.

 

(H) Bottom of the camera.

 A

 B

 C

 D

 E

 F

 E

G

H

The front plate. The lens mount encases the Compur-Rapid shutter, and lateral lever operates apertures, while speed selector wheel has a button. Values are displayed in the small window on the top of the viewing lens. Note the marking of the shutter on the speed selector wheel.

(A) The taking chamber, and the upper uptake spool chamber - note the now regularly lobed pressure foil.

 

(B) The lower spool chamber.

(C) The back is hinged and detachable. Externally has table and the red window is positioned at the middle. The closing mechanism is simple without locking lever, and the tripod mount is 3/8-16’. The inside of the back has fixed channelled pressure plate and crackled paint.

B

 A

C

(A) The taking chamber, and the upper uptake spool chamber - note the regularly lobed pressure foil.

 

(B) The lower spool chamber.

(C) The back is hinged and detachable. Externally has table and the red window is positioned at the middle. The closing mechanism is simple without locking lever, and the tripod mount is 3/8-16’. The inside of the back has fixed channelled pressure plate and crackled paint.

B

 A

C

The Compur-Rapid shutter casing and its mark.

The front plate.

Another advancement was the eye-level direct-vision viewfinder, which allowed for action photography. Together with a combined lever for cocking and releasing the shutter it made operation of the camera much faster. The 4x4 was also the first Rolleiflex equipped with a 2.8 lens, and the 6x6 (due technical reasons of relation between focal distance and frame size) would only see such feature as late as 1949. But why invest in a 4x4 and not straight in an improved 6x6? As said the release by other brands of smaller format cameras made F&H perceive that a boom of these cameras was about to happen. The camera was advertised as the perfect tool when being light and discreet was a necessity, such as travelling.

The advancement of the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original did not bring a big success to F&H. The camera was expensive and times were difficult due the depressive economic situation of the early 30s, and so the sales were poor and declining along its production. The models with less popularity, the 3.5 Tessar equipped, were progressively produced in lower numbers and the late models with these lenses (420 and 422) are very rare.

Nameplate numbers are somewhat a matter of debate, at least inconsistent between sources of reference. Claus Prochnow (1993) refers the range 127,000 to 523,000 for the 3 first models without bayonet on the taking lens. John Phillips (2010) refers the ranges 123,000 - 159,000 and 522,000 - 527,000. Ian Parker (1993) provides individual camera ranges based on Rollei-Fototechnic (at the time) archives – I will refer to these under each model below, with exceptions though. In any case the initial range cannot be 127,000 as stated by Prochnow, as Parker refers a few cameras with earlier serials, and in fact I have myself seen on sale a few cameras with serials #125,XXX. So to conclude on the range of the serial numbers of Rolleiflex 4x4 models 1 to 3, we have no reason to doubt of Phillips and thus assume 123,000 – 527,000 as the full range where batches of these cameras appeared. In 1938 the bayoneted model (model 4 - 430) appeared starting with the serial number 622,000.

According to Parker, the models 1 to 3 do not overlap in their production times, instead form a perfect evolutionary succession. The fact that the front plate of the 4x4 Original models can be upgraded poses additional noise to our understanding of how the camera evolved, and especially the serial number ranges and possible variations. For instance, I think that the first model can go up to circa 149,999, as one of my 411 cameras is #146,888, while Parker refers that 145,100 is the limit for this series. Also, I saw a camera, definitely a model 421 (with peep window) with #139,2XX, while Parker refers that model 421 (he described it as 414, see below) only starts at 150,000! It could be a 411 with the front panel upgraded, however, it also has the exposure table on the back (also substituted? Well that is possible).

The focusing knob. 

The focusing knob. 

The focusing knob. 

The four views of the camera.

Second Model 421

 

Serial no.: 153243

Date: 1933

Viewing lens: Heidoskop-Anastigmat (O.A.S.) Triplet 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 149582) – bayonet 28.5mm

Taking lens: Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 1354069) – bayonet 28.5mm

Notes: Depth-of-field table on back of viewing hood. Exposure table at the back of the camera. Focusing knob not covered marked ‘’Made in Germany’’ (export camera).

Franke and Heidecke first thought of naming the camera as "Bobyflex", as can be seen in the advert conceived for the journal Photo-Woche. But the advert was cancelled and finally they decided that the camera should be called also Rolleiflex.

The lack of specific name given by F&H to the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original led later to the widespread use of "Baby". This name is not related to the initial naming of Bobyflex.

Serial numbers and models

The 4x4s were assigned early serial number slots that were kept irrespective that the Rolleiflex 6x6 Standard was being assigned much higher number series along its production. It seems that while the 6x6 was getting closer to 500,000 the 4x4s were still kept in slots up to 155,000. The date in which F&H decided to make the jump to more ‘current’ numbering (the 522,000 4x4 batch) is unclear, but it must correspond to the final period of production of the 6x6 Standard (3.5), around 1937. The highest serial number batches of the 6x6 Standard go up to 568,000, with a few reaching 601,000 according to Prochnow (already within the Rolleiflex Automat 1 number range) in 1938. 

One aspect which I do not clearly understand, is the discrepancy of model names by Claus Prochnow and Ian Parker when it concerns factory designations. Both claim that the source was the Rollei-Fototechnic archives, and Ian Parker even acknowledges the help of Claus Prochnow in using such archived material. They both published their synthesis works in the same year! But even so they refer different factory designations. For what interests the Rolleiflex 4x4, it mainly concerns the different models. Well you may find names as not being too important, but it is nonetheless odd. Parker refers the second model, the cameras with peep window and Compur C00 shutter, as being factory designated as 412/413, while Prochnow refers 420/421. Are the archives really so incomplete or confusing? Not having any kind of access to official information I follow Claus Prochnow, the inside man, as the most credible source, thus following also the opinion of John Phillips.

I recently got a camera with serial #247427, out of the ranges described by Phillips or any other source, which state a gap between 159,000 and 522,000 in the serial numbering of the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original. According to the numbering of Parker it should at least be a model 423 with Compur-Rapid shutter – but is clearly a typical model 421 with a simple Compur shutter, small focusing knob and no front pins. While we can accept that cameras were upgraded in different ways, I can see no motive to believe that cameras were also downgraded… It is more likely that due the poor sales of all the models of the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original, a considerable amount of unfinished cameras of previous models accumulated at the factory along production, and probably dispatched at lower prices later, if on demand, and being numbered only then. Does this make sense? I guess only the remaining Rollei archive material, if still available and relevant, could clarify these issues.

If we try to get into the strange minds of F&H, in term of camera numbering, there would be no way in which a new but out-dated camera could be numbered above the superior model. Thus I can only conclude that the camera was assigned its number (247427) when model 423 was already in the batch that started on 522,000. In my rough guess we would be in 1937, the year the Rolleiflex Automat made its appearance. So, we still require more data on current available cameras to better assess the evolution and sort out with certainty which are manipulated cameras and which are not. But based on the obvious ‘confusion’ in what regards the development of the Rolleiflex 6x6 Original, perhaps we can expect also a degree of factory ‘chaos’ in the case of the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original.

Further searches made me discover two additional cameras with serial numbers 247xxx. A very similar camera to the above described (#247418), and an earlier model 411 (#247771). Thus it seems that a number of back cameras were made roughly in the same period.

The first model is easily distinguishable by the absence of the peep window above the viewing lens. This lens has a nickel-plated triangular flange with visible screws.  The first cameras had depth-of-field table on the back panel of the viewing hood with white background, later changed to black.

The shutter is a Compur C00. The cable release socket is located at the top. The scales of speeds and apertures are located respectively at the top and bottom of the taking lens.

The back has no exposure table. In the upper film chamber the pressure foil is bilobed. The focusing knob is small, initially with bright scale and after painted dark. 

See a more complete description below under the specific cameras.

The back of the hood. Early (A) and late (B) cameras.

The viewing lens

The focusing knob

The taking lens and the Compur shutter

The pressure foil at the upper spool chamber

Rolleiflex 4x4 Original Second Model

Names

Factory: 4RF K.1A Models 420 (1:3.5) and 421 (1:2.8)

Prochnow: 4x4 Model 2 Tessar 3.5 (PR 080) and Model 2 Tessar 2.8 (PR 081)

Phillips: Rolleiflex 4x4 (1931-38) Models 420 and 421

Serial numbers

420: 150,000 to 154,999

421: 150,000 to at least 247,427

Production dates

420: February 1933 to December 1934

421: February 1933 to 1937 (?) - see above sections

Production

420: 300

421: 1680

The shutter selector rings dented as to provide settings in a peep window above the now encased viewing lens, as on the Rolleiflex 6x6 Standard. The speed and aperture scales on the sides of the taking lens. Depth-of-field table on the back of the viewing hood and exposure table on the back. From 1933, camera front with pins for positioning on panorama head and stereoslide. Also from 1933 tripod socket 3/8 with or without 1/4 insert. The shutter is still a Compur C00. The socket for the release cable is now located at the lower part of the shutter. Apertures operated by a lever, and speeds by a button at the speed selector wheel.

See a more complete description below under the specific cameras.

First Model 410

 

Serial no.: 133248

Date: 1931

Viewing lens: Heidoskop-Anastigmat (O.A.S.) Triplet 6cm 1:3.5 (serial no. 84401) – bayonet 28.5mm

Taking lens: Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 6cm 1:3.5 (serial no. 1242129) – bayonet 28.5mm

Notes: Depth-of-field table on back of viewing hood. Focusing knob covered with leather (domestic camera).

The peep window above the viewing lens

The taking lens and the Compur shutter

The viewing lens

Rolleiflex 4x4 Original

Third Model

Names

Factory: 4RF K.1A Models 422 (1:3.5) and 423 (1:2.8)

Prochnow: 4x4 Model 3 Tessar 3.5 (PR 082) and Model 3 Tessar 2.8 (PR 083)

Phillips: Rolleiflex 4x4 (1931-38) Models 422 and 423

Serial numbers

422: 155,000 to 525,000

423: 155,000 to 525,000 

Production dates

422: December 1934 to June 1936

423: December 1934 to January 1938

Production

422: 140

423: 3100

The shutter is now a Compur-Rapid CR00. In the first cameras the marking is on the fixed part of the shutter case, in later cameras is on the speed selector wheel. Very late cameras have the new speed scale (250 instead of 300). Larger focusing knob with unpainted background. The pressure foil at the upper spool chamber is now unilobed. Otherwise essentially as previous model.

See a more complete description below under the specific cameras.

The larger focusing knob. 

The taking lens and the Compur shutter. Note the double pins at the bottom.

CAMERAS

Third Model 423

 

Serial no.: 155830

Date: 1935

Viewing lens: Heidoscop-Anastigmat (O.A.S.) Triplet 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 155326) – bayonet 28.5mm

Taking lens: Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 1316903) – bayonet 28.5mm

Notes: Depth-of-field table on back of viewing hood. Exposure table at the back of the camera. Focusing knob not covered with leather (domestic camera). Compur-Rapid marked on the inner fixed ring of shutter.

The larger focusing knob. 

The four views of the camera.

The pressure foil at the upper spool chamber

So the accumulated 3.5 lenses acquired for model 420 were used for the few model 422 specimens made (140), as reported. But the 2.8, more sellable, could have been used to produce later further cameras of model 421, when model 423 was already in production, and in this way dispatch accumulated material (bodies and front plates) on the shelves of the Braunschweig factory. A pity that Rolleiflex 4x4 Original cameras don’t have internal body numbers (as also the Rolleiflex Standard starting of 1932), which would undoubtedly put them in the correct production order, and dates inscribed on the mirrors as in the Rolleiflex Original. However in 1933 the Rolleicord 1 again used internal body numbers. As Prochnow referred ‘’F&H were quite negligent when it came to assigning camera numbers’’ (Rollei Report 1, page 216). And this says it all. 

(A) The taking chamber, and the upper uptake spool chamber - note the bilobed pressure foil.

 

(B) The lower spool chamber.

(C) The back is hinged and detachable. Externally has exposure table and the red window is positioned at the middle. The closing mechanism is simple without locking lever, and the tripod mount is 3/8-16’. The inside of the back has fixed channelled pressure plate and crackled paint.

 A

B

C

(A) The taking chamber, and the upper uptake spool chamber - note the bilobed pressure foil.

 

(B) The lower spool chamber.

(C) The back is hinged and detachable. Externally has exposure table and the red window is positioned at the middle. The closing mechanism is simple without locking lever, and the tripod mount is 3/8-16’. The inside of the back has fixed channelled pressure plate and crackled paint.

 A

B

C

The front plate.

The peep window on the top of the viewing lens

The front plate.

The nameplate. Note the out of range number.

(A-D) View of the four sides of the viewing hood in position for waiste level view. The viewing hood has independent lateral flaps and eye level vision via the cross flap with central mirror for pupil reflex.

 

(E-F) The viewing hood from top, closed and opened, showing the magnifying loupe.

(G) The viewing hood in position for eye level view, with the back front panel closed.

 

(H) Bottom of the camera.

 A

 B

 C

 D

 E

 F

 E

G

H

The four views of the camera.

The focusing knob. 

The four views of the camera.

The focusing knob. 

Second Model 421

 

Serial no.: 247427

Date: 1937 (?)

Viewing lens: Heidoskop-Anastigmat (O.A.S.) Triplet 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 150675) – bayonet 28.5mm

Taking lens: Carl Zeiss Jena Tessar 6cm 1:2.8 (serial no. 1346511) – bayonet 28.5mm

Notes: Depth-of-field table on back of viewing hood. Exposure table at the back of the camera in german. Focusing knob covered with leather (domestic market).

The strange case of # 247427

See description of the camera below

 A

 B

An exercise of assembling known cameras and ordering them according to models.

Data from my own cameras, Parker (1993) and internet searches. Dates were assumed as those referred by Prochnow (1993) for the earlier and later cameras in each model. - additional data will undoubtedly extend range of serials for each time interval.

In 1935 the external diameter was enlarged to 36mm. These filters were produced until 1949. The first ones appeared in 1935: Light yellow (hell), Medium yellow (mittel), U-V, Medium green (grun) and Light red (hellrot). Others followed: Light blue (helblau) and Orange (1939), Sport (1940), and Light green (1941). On the photo above see some of these filters. On the left a 423 camera with a light red filter. All these filters are for Black & White photography.

Filters for contrast

The first Rolleiflex filters for the mount push-on 28.5mm were designed for the 4x4 Original. They later became the standard filters for the Rolleiflex Standard and the Rolleicord until 1935. These filters have 30mm in external diameter and were produced between 1932 and 1935. There were 4 filters: U-V, Light yellow (hell), Medium yellow (mittel) and Medium green (grun). They are difficult to find, especially the green and U-V. 

The first simple push-on 28.5mm hood was manufactured from 1931 to 1941. It could be mounted on the 30mm filters and proxar lenses. But in fact there are two hoods with different dimensions of shade. This was spotted by Jan Böttcher, and is not referred by Claus Prochnow or John Phillips. 

My guess is that the larger one, which has the same shade as the push-on hood with clamps and the Bayonet 1 hood, must have been made from 1935. In this date appeared the graduated yellow filter which does not fit in the smaller one. This larger hood would be designed for the Rolleiflexes 4x4 and Standard, and Rolleicords IA and II model 1.

Hoods

The simple hood described above could not be used simultaneously with the 36mm filters that appeared in 1935. Thus in 1935 appeared the hood with two pressure clamps, one for the mount (28.5mm) and another internal for holding the 36mm filters.

The smaller simple hood mounted over a 30mm filter, on a 4x4 411 camera from 1932.

The 1935 hood with pressure clamps with a 36mm filter fitted internally, on a 4x4 423 camera from 1936.

The close-up lens for the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original are Proxar lens painted brown, made by Carl Zeiss between 1932 and 1949. Late specimens are black, I suppose made from around 1935-37, however no sources describe them. There are two sets:

Proxar 1 - 1m to 50 cm

Proxar 2 - 50cm to 33 cm

The Rolleipar lens for parallax correction could be fitted.

Close-up lens

A 4x4 423 camera with a pair of Proxar 2, and the early type of hood (this hood fits on the proxar). See also the Deckel release cable and a third party selftimer Haka Autoknips model 1 (1932).

The first polarizing filter for the Rolleiflex was the Herotar, made in 1936-37. In 1937 the name was changed to Bernotar, and was made until 1941 in a push-on 28.5mm bayonet.

Polarizing filter

Cases

There are multiple examples of different cases for the models of the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original. Some of the types (not their size of course) are shared with the Rolleiflex 6x6 Original, others with the Standards, and others with both. Here examples of the main types.

This coffin type of case is found only in the first model, and is shared with similar case for the Original 6x6. See the two attachments for 28.5mm filters.

The first everready case also shared with similar case for the Original 6x6. Probably also made only for the models 410 and 411.

Another everready case, similar to one of the types for the Rolleiflex Standard. Probably designed for the models 420 and 421.

A very similar case probably designed for the models 422 and 423. Note the larger aperture for the larger focusing knob of these models. Also new the window at the back for the exposure table and the opening for the tripod.

Another type of everready case probably designed for the late cameras of the models 420 and 421. 

The lens cap is exclusive of the Rolleiflex 4x4 Original for the models without double bayonet on the taking lens.

Lens caps

Bibliography

Web pages

Claus Prochnow (1993) Rollei Report 1

Ian Parker (1993) Complete Rollei TLR: collector’s guide

Ian Parker (1996) Rollei TLR: The History

John Phillips (2010) The classic Rollei: a definitive guide

ACCESSORIES